The January 2019 Chemical Bulletin Print

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    Next Meeting

    Joint meeting with AIChE

    Dr. Andrew Lee

    - Northwestern University -
    Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering

    "Rational Cancer Vaccine Design Based on Spherical Nucleic Acids"

    5:30 - 9:00 PM, Friday January 25
    LIVE Lecture at Roosevelt University- - Schaumburg
    PLUS remote at Purdue Northwest (Hammond, IN)

    Register Now

    ABSTRACT

    Nanomedicine stands to make major contributions to immunotherapy. Nanostructures that can be designed to present and deliver immunestimulatory molecules to cells of the immune system provide a way to boost, modulate and tune immune responses to disease. Spherical nucleic acids (SNAs) are a specific and promising class of nanostructure that are we are developing as immunotherapeutic vaccines for cancer. In spite of what is known about the molecular pathways for immune system stimulation and antigens specific for many types of cancer, cancer vaccines have historically not shown outstanding success clinically. What remains poorly understood is how best to deliver and present antigen and adjuvant molecules to the immune system. SNAs have the characteristic feature of a nanoparticle core presenting chemically functionalized TLR agonist oligonucleotides at high surface density. SNAs are structurally well-defined and modular in nature; through synthetic chemistry, we have controlled several structural features of SNAs independently (e.g., core composition and size, position of antigen). This approach has enabled our rational design of vaccines based on SNA structures and has identified several structural features critical for stimulating anti-cancer immune responses. We have found that variations in the structures of SNAs, those that are compositionally equivalent but structurally distinct, lead to major differences in the quality of induced antigen-specific immune responses. Our development of SNAs as potential cancer vaccines has not only led to the identification of structures that generate anti-tumor responses and survival benefits in vivo, but has also allowed us to establish the structural and mechanistic basis for function and to drive further improvements in vaccine design.

    PROGRAM

    • 5:30 - 6:30  Registration and Poster Session
    • 6:00 - 6:20  Pre-dinner presentation: Joel Schoenberg (Chicago ACS YCC Chair)
    • 6:30 - 7:30  Dinner 
    • 7:30 - 7:45  Introductory remarks
    • 7:45 - 8:30  Main Lecture

    LOCATIONS:

    MAIN SITE (With live speaker): Roosevelt University - Schaumburg
    STREAMING LOCATION #1: Purdue University Northwest (Hammond, IN)

    TEACHERS! All K-12 educators can receive continuing education credits for attending our meetings. Get your CE form at the registration desk.


    POSTER SESSION

    Undergraduates can present posters describing their research, and the best one will win a prize! Register your poster here:

     ** http://chicagoacs.org/form.php?form_id=47 **

    ! Did you present a poster at a recent conference? Bring it out and present it again!

     

     


    PRE-DINNER EVENT:

    Joel Shoenburg, YCC Chair
    "Lead, the versatile metal that fixed engine knock"

    This short presentation dives into a portion of the book, "Prometheans in the Lab." Most people today know that lead poses some health risk. But the book transports us to a time where lead was everywhere, even in our toothpaste containers. I would like to talk about the driving factors in science when health was no issue. What did leaded fuel succeed at doing? What did it fail at?

    BUFFET DINNER - Main site only

    • Entrees: Rosemary chicken, Vegetable lasagna in tomato cream sauce
    • Garden salad, tricolor roasted potatoes, roasted vegetable medley, diner roll
    • Desert, beverage


    RESERVATIONS:

    Dinner Registration Deadline: 12:00 Noon on Tuesday, January 22
    Lecture-only Registration Deadline: 12:00 noon Thursday, January 24

    QUESTIONS OR NON-WEB RESERVATIONS?  Please contact the Section Office via phone (847-391-9091) or email ([email protected]).


    BIOGRAPHY

    Andrew Lee is a Research Assistant Professor at Northwestern University, in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering. Following his PhD training in chemistry at Harvard University post-doctoral training at Northwestern University, he began an appointment as an independent investigator at Northwestern University. Andrew Lee’s activity in nanomedicine research involves the development of spherical nucleic acid (SNA) nanostructures as therapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer (immunotherapeutic or gene regulatory mechanisms of action), in research programs led by Professor Chad Mirkin at Northwestern University. This research is examining the chemical composition and structure of SNAs (the core, oligonucleotide, and antigen and peptide-conjugation chemistries) as the drivers of the ability of SNAs to function as agents that enter targeted cells and enhance the activity of therapeutic oligonucleotides (as immunostimulatory compounds). These research efforts are supported by the National Cancer Institute and Prostate Cancer Foundation. Related research projects, aimed at innovating vaccine immunotherapy for prostate cancer, are focused on discovering neoantigens through the identification of post-translationally modified proteins and analysis of the immunogenicity of these proteins.

    MAIN LOCATION - DIRECTIONS and PARKING:

    LIVE LECTURE:

    Roosevelt University - Schaumburg
    1400 Roosevelt Rd., Room TBD
    Schaumburg, IL 60173

    Map & Directions: http://chicagoacs.org/images/downloads/Maps_of_venues/venuemap_rooseveltschaumburg_2017.pdf

    PARKING: Free in lot adjacent to building


    STREAMING LOCATIONS - DIRECTIONS and PARKING:

    STREAMING LOCATION #1:

    Purdue University Northwest
    Gyte Building, Room 240
    2200 169th St.
    Hammond, IN  46323

    Map: http://chicagoacs.org/images/downloads/Maps_of_venues/purduenw_map.pdf

    PARKING: free

    Tickets

    $15.00 MAIN SITE DINNER - Member ticket
    $15.00 MAIN SITE DINNER - AIChE member ticket
    $17.00 MAIN SITE DINNER - Nonmember ticket
    $0.00 MAIN SITE - Lecture only registration

    $0.00 REMOTE SITE #1 - Lecture only registration

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    Letter from the Chair

    The Chicago Section of the American Chemical Society wishes everyone a very happy 2019.

    Chicago ACS has a long tradition and legacy of community involvement and outreach, and 2018 was no exception. Aside from our regular monthly professional programming, we very much supported the greater Chicagoland chemistry enterprise. We continued to host the Chemistry Olympiad competition for high school students, stimulating achievement in future chemistry study. We hosted multiple Chemistry Merit Badge events for Chicago-area Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts of America. We supported two Project SEED projects for disadvantaged high school seniors, enabling them to gain real laboratory experience and college scholarships. We hosted our annual activity booth at the Illinois State Fair, greeting many hundreds of visitors, and presenting a variety of exciting chemistry demonstrations and hands-on activities suitable for young students. Literature was distributed on environmental issues, lists of chemistry educational resources, and ACS activities for students, science teachers, and the general public. We were awarded a ChemLuminary Award for our 2017 participation in Chemists Celebrate Earth Day, in which we took an early lead in the Chicago March for Science and leveraging the ACS Network to coordinate efforts globally.

    These achievements aside, 2018 imparted some grief upon our section governance with the untimely passing of our Chair, Anthony Toussaint. Dr. Toussaint left an indelible impression of selfless service on our section, and he is sorely missed. We are very grateful for Ken Fivizzani, who stepped into the Chair role to finish out the 2018 term. I extend a big thanks to our entire Board of Directors, whose many volunteer hours keep our ship afloat and moving forward.

    Continuing work that Dr. Toussaint intended for the year, over much of 2018 the Board worked hard to examine and revise the operating bylaws for the section, allowing for improved and streamlined governance. Following those efforts, we will begin 2019 with some much needed strategic planning to ensure that Chicago ACS can best fulfill its long-term mission – to encourage the advancement of the chemical sciences and their practitioners. Our sincere hope is that in doing so we will be even better situated to partner with local industrial and academic institutions to support the Chicagoland chemistry community and to develop a culture that gives back to our young chemistry students, while promoting diversity, inclusion, safety, and ethics in all we do. I am grateful for the immense encouragement shown thus far by our Board in supporting these efforts.

    Please consider attending one of our events this upcoming year. They provide excellent networking opportunities and exposure to a vibrant Chicago chemistry community. Also consider joining one of our many committees, whose work includes educational outreach at all levels, promotion of diversity, interaction with government officials, implementation of technology to promote chemistry, community activities and more.

    None of our work could be possible without the energy of our volunteers and willingness of our partner organizations, and fresh ideas are always most welcome. I highly encourage you to contact me directly at [email protected] if you would like us to work with you or even have your institution host a monthly meeting.

    - Tim Marin, 2019 Section Chair

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    Letter from the Past Chair

    The Chicago Section is finishing up another year of member activities and outreach events. We have sponsored ten program meetings, highlighted by the presentation of the Willard Gibbs Medal to Professor Cynthia Burrows of the University of Utah and the presentation of Northwestern University’s Basolo Medal to Professor Edward Solomon of Stanford University. Our outreach programs included Chemistry Celebrates Earth Week, the Illinois State Fair, Chemistry Day, Girl Scout and Boy Scout chemistry merit badge programs, Chemistry Scholarship Examinations, and several other activities. We mourned the loss of Tony Toussaint, our Section Chair, in June. Tony’s service to our Section reflected his care for and support of our members. We miss his upbeat demeanor and positive attitude. Our Board members stepped up to fill in wherever needed, and our activities continued with good participation. As usual, Gail Wilkening made so many extra contributions. I appreciate everyone’s support during this time. From an administrative viewpoint, we have approved a new set of Bylaws and are finalizing our historical Policy Declarations. Our Board members have responded to a survey about the Section with suggestions for further improving our organization, programs, and public outreach. Tim Marin, our 2019 Chair, is leading our review of the survey results. Although designated by a sad event, I was honored to serve the Chicago Section as Chair for part of 2018. Please give Tim your strong support and encouragement during 2019. If you have not been an active member of the Chicago Section, consider getting involved in 2019, perhaps by attending one of our program meetings. Many of our program meetings are streamed to multiple locations; one is probably close to you.

    - Ken Fivizzani, 2018 Section Chair

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    Board and Meeting Calendar

    Chicago ACS board and monthly meeting schedule for 2019

    BOARD MEETINGS

    DINNER MEETINGS

    Jan 10
    Feb 7
    Mar 14
    Apr 11
    May 9
    June 13
    Aug 1
    Sept 12
    Oct 10
    Nov 14
    Dec 12

    Jan 25
    Feb 22
    Mar 21
    Apr 8
    May 3
    June 20

    Sept 27
    Oct 25
    Nov 21
    Dec 13

     

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    Board & Committee Members

    2019 Board and Committee Chairs

    Chair
    [email protected]

    Tim Marin

    Chair-Elect
    [email protected]

    Paul Brandt

    Past Chair
    [email protected]

    Ken Fivizzani

    Vice Chair
    [email protected]

    Josh Kurutz

    Secretary
    [email protected]

    Rebecca Weiner

    Treasurer
    [email protected]

    Amber Arzadon

    Directors
    [email protected]

    Aleks Baranczak
    David Crumrine
    Doris Espiritu
    Fran Kravitz
    Margy Levenberg
    Milt Levenberg
    Carmen Marquez
    Barb Moriarty
    Oluseye (Kenny) Onajole
    Sherri Rukes
    Rebecca Sanders
    Margaret Schott
    Andrea Twiss-Brooks
    Linghong Zhang

    Councilors
    [email protected]

    Charles Cannon
    David Crumrine
    Ken Fivizzani
    Russ Johnson
    Fran Kravitz
    Margy Levenberg
    Milt Levenberg
    Inessa Miller
    Barb Moriarty
    Susan Shih

    Alternate Councilors
    [email protected]

    Amber Arzadon
    Paul Brandt
    Omar Farha
    Tom Higgins
    Josh Kurutz
    Katie Leach
    Ilana Lemberger
    Tim Marin
    Carmen Marquez
    Rebecca Weiner

     

    Committee Chairs

    Annual Report
    [email protected]

    Ken Fivizzani

    Awards
    [email protected]

    Inessa Miller

    Budget Director
    [email protected]

    Fran Kravitz

    Bylaws
    [email protected]

    Russ Johnson

    Chemical Bulletin Business Manager

    TBD

    Chemical Bulletin Editor
    [email protected]

    Paul Brandt

    College Education
    [email protected]

    Bob Chapman
    Bernard Santarsiero

    Communication & Technology
    [email protected]

    Josh Kurutz

    Community Activities
    [email protected]

    Avrom Litin
    Raj Govindarajan

    Comptroller
    [email protected]

    Herb Golinkin

    Assistant Comptroller

    Barbara Moriarty

    Development
    [email protected]

    Help wanted

    Distinguished Service Award
    [email protected]

    Ken Fivizzani

    Employment & Professional Relations
    [email protected]

    Fran Kravitz

    Environmental & Lab Safety
    [email protected]

    Irene Cesa

    Gibbs Arrangements
    [email protected]

    Margy Levenberg

    Great Lakes Regional Meeting 2019
    [email protected]

    Barbara Moriarty

    Great Lakes Regional Meeting (General)
    [email protected]

    Susan Shih

    High School Education
    [email protected]

    Russ Kohnken
    Sherri Rukes

    Historian
    [email protected]

    Josh Kurutz

    Hospitality
    [email protected]

    Richard Cornell

    House
    [email protected]

    Simonida Grubjesic

    Illinois State Fair
    [email protected]

    Fran Kravitz
    Milt Levenberg

    Long Range Planning
    [email protected]

    Susan Shih

    Membership
    [email protected]

    help wanted

    Minority Affairs
    [email protected]

    Charles Cannon

    National Affairs
    [email protected]

    Fran Kravitz

    Nominations
    [email protected]

    TBD

    Office Affairs
    [email protected]

    Susan Shih

    Policy
    [email protected]

    Ken Fivizzani

    Primary Education
    [email protected]

    Amber Arzadon
    Fran Kravitz

    Program Committee
    [email protected]

    Andrea Twiss-Brooks

    Project SEED
    [email protected] 

    Raelynn Miller

    Public Affairs
    [email protected]

    Mike Koehler

    Public Relations
    [email protected]

    Russ Johnson
    Bill Hayward

    Senior Chemists
    [email protected]

    Charles Cannon
    Louis DeFillipi

    Stieglitz Lecture
    [email protected]          

    Josh Kurutz

    Trustees
    [email protected]

    Ken Fivizzani
    Mark Kaiser
    Milt Levenberg

    Women Chemists
    [email protected]

    Rebecca Weiner

    Younger Chemists
    [email protected]

    Joel Schoenburg
    Mona Soflaee

     

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    Cartoon

    Sidney Harris cartoons

    It’s fun to enjoy Sidney Harris’s cartoons at their most basic level. But Harris’s cartoons typically include several levels of humor that are particularly relished by “insiders.” Regarding the chemicals mentioned in this cartoon, Harris “think[s] these actually are from canned soup. Maybe more than one. Generally I make up names that I don’t even know exist. Once I had an equation in a cartoon for the New Yorker, and they wanted me to assure them that it was gibberish. If it wasn’t, they said they’d get a lot of angry and critical mail.”

    -- Jeffrey I. Seeman, University of Richmond

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    Sponsors of this issue


     

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    Correction

    In the October 2018 Bulletin I published an article on Rubber Stamps. I had stated that this stamp was absent and presumed to be used after 1960 and to be the work of James A. Wuellner. However, Dolores Kenney pointed out that this was published as a logo for the Miner Labs. Lo and behold I did find it in the early Bulletin days. Carl S. Miner used it in his business card ads that were in the Bulletin from November 1920 – December 1939, Volumes 7-26. After that, Miner continued to publish ads, but the logo disappeared from the ad. One of his ads is shown here. Thank you Dolores for that catch!

    - Paul Brandt

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    Someone You Should Know

    Claude Lucchesi

    This month, I switch gears to accommodate a very special person, Claude Lucchesi. I had known Claude for as many years as I have been a member in the Chicago Section. I decided to write about Claude after I received an email from his wife Ruth. She wanted the Section to know that Claude was diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia a couple of years earlier and she needed my help in piecing together his service with the ACS. How could I say no? I began thinking about how it would be nice to have Claude as one of my subjects for my “Someone You Should Know” article. Dr. Lucchesi was chair of the Chicago Section in 1977-1978 and was a Councilor for the Section from 1974 until 2009. Claude was a soft-spoken man, but I remember that he always got his point across at a Board meeting. Sadly, Claude passed away on October 25 but I was lucky and got to see him a few weeks earlier before his death. Claude was still his charming self with his strong distinctive voice. Josh Kurutz and I went to visit him and brought a poster with photos of all his friends from the Chicago Section. He was so glad to see us and the photos delighted him. We spent time reminiscing about old friends. This will be the memory I will hold of him in my heart, old friends just getting together.

    Claude was born in Chicago and the eldest of three children. His parents, Nello and Anna Bellizia Lucchesi owned a grocery store. Claude and his two younger brothers helped in the family business. He graduated from Waller High School in 1947 and attended the University of Illinois first at Navy Pier and then in Champaign/Urbana. Claude received his B.S. in Chemistry with a minor in Chemical Engineering. He went on to Northwestern University to earn his Ph.D. in 1954. His dissertation was titled” Study of Chelating Agents for the Determination of Boric Acid in Aqueous Solution” under Donald D. DeFord.

    Dr. Lucchesi lead a very full career as a chemist. He began his career in 1954 with the Shell Oil Company in Houston, Texas as a group leader in spectroscopy. In 1956, he returned to the Chicago area to work for Sherwin-Williams as the Director of the Analytical Research Department. Claude left Chicago again to join Exxon Mobil in Metuchen, New Jersey where he started as Manager of the Analytical & Physical Chemistry Department but was later promoted to Manager of the Chemical Coatings Laboratory. In 1968, he joined Northwestern University as Director of the Analytical Services Lab for the Chemistry Department. He established an analytical instrumentation laboratory and directed five professionals. He consulted for the research faculty and industrial clients and taught courses in advanced lab practices. He remained at Northwestern University until 1996. Claude was a doer and in 1980 he co-founded the Analytical Laboratory Managers Associations (ALMA). ALMA is an association of laboratory managers that provides a forum for improving laboratory management skills worldwide through conferences, short courses, networks and discussion groups. He was the contributing editor for Analytical Chemistry from 1974 through 1979. In 1991 he presented “Managing the Chemical Analysis Support Laboratory” workshops throughout the U.S, Australia, Africa, China, Europe, India and South America. Claude also founded a quarterly journal, Managing the Modern Laboratory in 1995 and was its first editor.

    Claude joined the ACS in 1951 and was active at both the local and national level. Locally, he served as Program Chair from 1960 to 1961 and again in 1970 to 1971. He was a director and a trustee for the Section along with holding positions as Continuing Education Chair, Long Range Planning Committee Chair and Great Lakes Regional Meeting Chair. At the national level, Claude served on the Committee on Chemistry and Public Affairs, the Committee on Constitution and Bylaws, the Committee on International Activities, the Committee on Meetings and Expositions, the Professional Relations Committee and the Senior Chemists Committee. His honors included ALMA Award for Distinguished Service to Laboratory Management, Sigma Xi, Phi Lambda Upsilon Society for Applied Spectroscopy Distinguished Service Award, Analytical Laboratory Managers Association Service Award and the Chicago Association of Technological Societies Award of Merit. I was very surprised to learn that he never earned the Chicago Section Distinguished Service Award.

    Dr. Lucchesi was married for 64 years to his beautiful wife, Ruth. They had two sons, Nello Williams and K. Gregory. Claude spent time studying the Italian language and traveling throughout Italy, especially Tuscany. He loved music and theater. Claude enjoyed hosting many Northwestern foreign graduate students and visiting scholars at his home. His wife tells me that he read the Wall Street Journal daily, woke up listening to NPR, and settled down at the end of the day to PBS programs on the TV. Claude was also a proud grandfather.

    I never got the chance to ask him questions for this article, but his wife Ruth filled me in along with material in the ACS vault and his LinkedIn page. It is regretful that we will never be able to hear his final words of wisdom to our members but what I see is a man dedicated to his love of chemistry, family and friends.

    - Fran Kravitz

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    Special Feature

    Rubber Stamps - 5

    As stated back in the March, 2018 Chemical Bulletin, I was given a plaque with five rubber stamps that were used in the Bulletin back in the 50’s. Over the course of the year I have shared these stamps with you and given as much history on them as I could. Until recently I believed that all of these were the work of James A. Wuellner of Standard Oil Co. He was the Assistant Editor of the Chemical Bulletin in 1955. This particular sketch I found in the January 1950 edition and is the earliest of the bunch. It can be seen in its original format by using the Northwestern University Library http://books.northwestern.edu/viewer.html?id=inu:inu-mntb-0005391474-bk. This image is item #12356 – pg 13 of the January issue.

    The stamp can be found within the article entitled “The Artists Retort” which was a response by a chemists’ art friends. The Bulletin in the day had a running article called “What Chemists Think”. The question posed in the November issue was “What do you think of modern art?” which can be found on item #12270 from the link above. The chemists were none too kind to the artists. Dali in particular was criticized. To counter in The Artists Retort, they replied to the chemists. A number of the artists tried explaining modern art to the chemists while others found the chemists to be “pinheads”. One artist did suggest that modern artists were just taking a shortcut. Nonetheless, the opening paragraph says that We are very pleased to have a concrete suggestion on the chemist and art from Harry N. Holmes, former ACS president who is also an artist.” So if I read this correctly, this stamp is the work of this former ACS president, Harry N. Holmes who was also a professor of chemistry at Oberlin College from 1914-1945. It was in this article that Holmes proposed an art showing at the 118th ACS National Meeting in Chicago. These art shows continued on in these ACS meetings as mentioned in the May, 2018 issue entitled Rubber Stamps-3.

    - Paul Brandt

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    Recent Meeting

    Highlights of the December Meeting:

    Holiday Party with Prof. Dick Co: "Solar Fuels: Turning Thin Air into Gasoline"
    PLUS Iota Sigma Pi, Food&Toy Drive

    Festivity reigned at the December meeting of the Chicago ACS, featuring Dr. Dick Co and his talk “Solar Fuels: Turning Thin Air Into Gasoline” Dec. 15 at North Central College (Naperville, IL). Attendees got a healthy infusion of solid science, a lesson on the difference between advanced technology and innovation, concrete examples of effective and engaging science education, plus cheery Iota Sigma Pi activities, gifts and prizes, holiday cheer, photo albums of Chicago Section years past, and even Santa hats. The full photo gallery is now available here: https://chicagoacs.starchapter.com/gallery.php?id=75

    Dr. Co covered a variety of solar-themed subjects, starting by surveying the field of solar energy, which transforms sunlight into electricity. He stressed how technical advances have enabled reductions in cost and complexity that ensure this technology will play a major role supplying electricity well into the future. Then he covered other, newer uses for solar devices. For instance, he showed exotic slabs of solid state materials that use sunlight to split water directly into hydrogen and oxygen gases without using external electricity-powered devices. Co’s own specialty is using light-absorbing materials to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuel from captured CO2. This remarkable process accomplishes two major aims: 1) creating liquid fuel, which is very energy-dense and compatible with current combustion technology, and 2) removing CO2 from the atmosphere. As an entertaining aside, he mentioned The Air Company, which transforms captured CO2 into ethanol; they sell top-shelf vodka made from the product. To dive into the technical details, you should watch the video of his talk, which is embedded on our event page: https://chicagoacs.org/meetinginfo.php?id=136 .

    Dr. Co proved to be an engaging speaker in other ways, too. He led the talk showing photos of his wedding in which all family members on both sides are chemists. After quoting Maya Angelou’s thoughts on “doing better”, he discussed the importance he places on educating young people about chemistry and climate change. He believes that youth will push for a better future if they’re educated about climate change AND inspired to develop technical solutions once they see some in action. To help, he and our September 2017 speaker Sameer Patwardhan have engineered robust devices for middle and high school classrooms in which electricity is generated using everyday materials. Using one kit, students build a dye-sensitized solar cell using (light-absorbing) blackberries, then power an LED using their device. Using another kit, they power an LED by placing slices of fruit atop pairs of bolts made of different metals.

    In the talk, Co announced he is leaving Northwestern to partner with Patwardhan in a new venture, PC Consulting, that consults on solar energy matters and sells their educational kits. After the talk, the team sold a number of kits on the meeting floor, using Square devices on their phones to conduct sales transactions.

    Aside from the talk, attendees enjoyed a number of other activities.
    • Holiday spirits were raised by the wearing of Santa hats provided around the room.

    • Our partner the Aurum Iodide chapter of Iota Sigma Pi, the women chemists honor society, showed up in strong numbers, per annual tradition. They joined ACS in giving door prizes (USB bracelets), and also raised money by raffling four beautiful chemistry-themed wooden cutting boards; each depicts a different food-related molecule (sucrose, cholesterol, aspartame, and Vitamin C).

    • In a brief ceremony, Section Chair Ken Fivizzani, who took over after Tony Toussaint’s untimely death in June, presented an engraved gavel to incoming Chair Tim Marin, professor at Benedictine University ([email protected]). In return, Marin presented Fivizzani with his Part Chair lapel pin. Remarkably, this is Fivizzani’s THIRD Past Chair pin – he is the only person in Chicago ACS history to receive that many.

    • Your section historian ([email protected]) showcased a number of photo albums from the archives. Not only did attendees enjoy reminiscing, but several helped out by recording the identities of previously unidentified subjects! Thanks to everyone who helped!

    • Dinner was well-received; comments about dinner and offers to assist planning future events can be directed to the organizers at [email protected].

    • Hospitality Chair Richard Cornell sparked interest with his customary curious door prizes for everyone; this author received a container of Tide pods, and bearded Dr. Co won a fine Harry’s razor.

    Thanks go to

    • Dr. Co, who stepped up with a great presentation on short notice after Dr. Chasar became unable to travel to us.

    • NCC Prof. Paul Brandt, who hosted the meeting.

    • Ken Fivizzani, who chaired the meeting.

    • Janet Ferroni, Teresa Bixby and Tanya Hunter, who emceed Iota Sigma Pi’s activities.

    • Andrea Twiss-Brooks, our Program chair ([email protected]), who is responsible for securing our meeting speakers and facilitating publicity.

    • Simonida Grubjesic, our House chair ([email protected]), who secures event locations and arranges for dinner and other needs.

    • Dr. Hal Pinnick, for enabling our meeting to reach our satellite location at Purdue University Northwest in Hammond, IN.

    01) Solar fuels expert Dr. Dick Co, transitioning between Northwestern U. and his own firm PC Consulting, introduces his talk. (photo by Josh Kurutz)


    02) Section Chair Ken Fivizzani leads his final Chicago Section meeting. (photo by Josh Kurutz)


    03) Benedictine Prof. Tim Marin receives his chair’s gavel from outgoing Chair Ken Fivizzani, marking Marin’s transition from Chair-Elect to Section Chair. (photo by Josh Kurutz)


    04) Iota Sigma Pi, the women chemists’ honor society, turned out in force, and raffled off four gorgeous chemistry-themed wooden cutting boards (one depicted at the right). L->R, Top Row: Janet Ferroni, Deb Howell, Vivian Sullivan; Bottom row: Gayle Chany, Julia Brinkman Wiester, Teresa Bixby. (photo by Josh Kurutz)


    05) 2019 Section Chair Tim Marin and Section Historian Josh Kurutz. (photo by Milt Levenberg)


    06) E-commerce took place on the floor after the talk. In the foreground here, Dr. Co sells a classroom kit for making solar cells using blackberries, taking payment with a Square device. In the background, his partner (and Sept. 2017 speaker) Sameer Patwardhan sells a “fruit battery” kit. (photo by Josh Kurutz)

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    Who Is This?

    1995 Telethon

    by Josh Kurutz, Section Historian

    Back in 1995, a group from Chicago ACS helped raise funds in a telethon. This looks like it was fun, but the pile of photos in the archives contains little information. If you know anything about this outing, please write to [email protected].

    Clues:

    • The phone number and setting suggest this was a WTTW fundraiser. A Google search of the number shows it now applies to a specific Subway restaurant, so please don’t call them. Also, please don’t call the 773 version - it appears to belong to an individual who is probably tired of odd calls for a telethon. However, it does look like the 773 number was used by WTTW.
    • tel-B is Charles Cannon.
    • tel-F looks like Larry Berman.
    • tel-J may be Ellis Fields.

    We’d like to hear from anyone who participated in this event. What was it like? Was it for WTTW or a different organization? Who organized it? Where was it? Any idea what month/day? Please send any information to [email protected]. You can review larger photos online in the gallery: https://chicagoacs.starchapter.com/gallery.php?id=76 .

    NEWS: The Who Is This? project now has its own web page, https://chicagoacs.org/WhoIsThis. Here you’ll find an organized showcase of photo galleries featured here in the Bulletin, plus articles describing what is known about the events depicted. Each photo bears a caption updated with insights contributed from everyone who’s written to the Historian. Check it out!

    Thanks in advance for your help!

    ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: For their help in December (https://chicagoacs.org/gallery.php?id=69), thanks go to Keith Meyer (Kraft, retired), Russ Johnson (ACS Fellow, Honeywell, retired), Dolores Kenney* (Olson & Cepuritis, Ltd.), Milt and Margy Levenberg (retired from Abbott and Stepan, respectively), Veronica Reichert, Judy and Russ Reuter, Lee Marek (UIC), Avrom Litin. 

    *ERRATUM: In the December issue, we indicated Dolores Kenney was retired from Gillette. Though she no longer works at Gillette, she is not retired, but currently works for the law firm of Olson and Cepuritis, Ltd. We apologize for the error.

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    Help the Chicago Section

    Bookmark this today! When you make purchases from Amazon.com, you can now give a free donation to the Chicago Section every time you shop on Amazon.com. Simply shop at Amazon using the following link:

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    Whenever you start there to make a purchase, the Chicago Section will get a percentage of your purchase, with no additional cost to you. It's easy, free, and supports one of your favorite organizations, so why not use it?

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    Calendar of Events

    UPCOMING EVENTS

    January 10: Chicago ACS Section Board Meeting

    January 25: Chicago ACS Section Dinner Meeting. Dr. Andrew Lee, Northwestern University College of Engineering

    January 29: The Annual IIT Bridge Competition at IIT’s Main Campus (Herman Hall). You can find information on the Bridge Competition at http://bridgecontest.phys.iit.edu/public/chicago/index

    February 7: Chicago ACS Section Board Meeting

    February 10: Family Open House at the Lederman Science Center at Fermi from 1-5 pm. Children must be accompanied by an adult (There’s plenty for the grown-ups too). Most appropriate for children in grades 3 and up. http://ed.fnal.gov/events/openhouse/

    February 22: Chicago ACS Section Dinner Meeting.

    February 22: Spring 2019 Chicago Symposium Series on Excellence in Teaching Mathematics and Science: Research and Practice at Northern Illinois University – Naperville from 11 am to 6 pm. https://www.math.uic.edu/chicagosymposium/index_html

    February 23: DuPage Area STEM Expo at the Illinois Institute of Technology - Rice Campus at 201 East Loop Drive, Wheaton (10:30 – 3:30) “Engineering New Horizons”. https://appliedtech.iit.edu/stemexpo

    March 14: Chicago ACS Section Board Meeting

    March 17 – 21: Pittcon 2018 will be in Philadelphia, PA. http://pittcon.org/

    April 11 – 14: 67th Annual NSTA’s National Conference on Science Education, St. Louis, MO. http://s6.goeshow.com/nsta/national/2019/overview.cfm

    March 21: Chicago ACS Section Dinner Meeting.

    March 22: Spring 2019 Chicago Symposium Series on Excellence in Teaching Mathematics and Science: Research and Practice at Loyola University from 10 am to 5 pm. https://www.math.uic.edu/chicagosymposium/index_html

    March 31 – April 4: 257th American Chemical Society National Meeting and Exposition “Chemistry for New Frontiers”, Orlando, FL. https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/meetings/national-meeting.html

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